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Following oil revenue’s money in South Sudan.

By Daniel Deng Bol and Leila osman(Juba-South) Sudan is the most oil-dependent country in the world, with oil accounting to 98 percent of the country revenue for almost totality of export,and around 60% of its gross domestic product (GDP). As a new nation, the country has the dual challenge of dealing with the legacy of more than 50 years of conflict and continued instability, along with huge development needs. Under the comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) that ended the twenty years long civil war in Sudan stated that the local communities living in vicinity to oil-extraction areas shall benefit from oil industry. It set a 2% share of oil revenue should go to producing states in proportion to their out put while 3% to the local communities. The local communities benefit from oil-revenue given through local government and from development projects offered bythe oil companies operating in the area. The Transitional […]

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South Sudan debt level stands at 60 percent of GDP – Finance minister

Finance and Economic Planning minister Hon. Stephen Dhieu Dau speaking to the press. (FIle Photo)

By  Daniel  Deng Bol South Sudan  debt level could  be expected to rise to around sixty percent of Gross Domestic  Product (GDP), a trend that has prompted the  government  to propose a lean 2017/2018  budget  limiting borrowing from the World Bank  and other sources  to two  billion, one hundred  and seventy million(2,172 million). The total outstanding debt is provisionally estimated at fifty-four billion, seven hundred and sixty-seven million Pounds (54,767 million). This includes two million, two hundred and twelve million Pounds (2,212 million) of borrowing from commercial banks, and nineteen billion, nine hundred and seventy million pounds (SSP 19,970 Million) of direct borrowing from   Bank of South Sudan. It also includes an outstanding recapitalizing claim to   the Bank of South Sudan of two billion, one hundred and sixty-five million (SSP 2,165 Million). The figure also includes outstanding oil advances equivalent to eighteen billion, two hundred and eighty- nine million Pounds (18,289 million) and external loans to the World Bank and china of Fourteen billion, two hundred and ninety-six million Pounds (SSP 14,296 million. The outstanding debt […]

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The National Dialogue Strategy: A Conceptual Overview

Dr Francis M. Deng served for five years as the United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Advisor on the Prevention of Genocide at the level of Under-Secretary-General

An opportunity to address the complex web of conflicts afflicting South Sudan By Dr Francis M. Deng (July 5, 2017) This concept paper outlines some of the principal eleme nts involved in promoting peace, unity, reconciliation and a shared sense of national identity, the overriding goals of the National Dialogue. The National Dialogue is an opportunity to address the complex web of conflicts afflicting South Sudan through a top-down-bottom-up process that links the national, regional, and the grassroots levels of the interconnected conflicts. Achieving the National Dialogue’s goal requires reinforcing and strengthening traditional authorities whose ability to contribute to the maintenance of law and order and to the security and stability of the country at the grassroots level, has long been tested.The Dialogue’s Steering Committee needs to be assisted by resource persons to carry out consultations with stakeholders at these levels and to report to the National Conference which will then prepare an integrated […]

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South Sudan humanitarian needs remain dire despite IPC report – Plan International

Plan International Director of International Programmes, Mr. Jonathan Mitchell, during a press briefing in Juba

By Daniel Deng Bol Plan International has said the humanitarian needs in South Sudan have remained extremely higher despite recent findings of the Integrated Phase Classification (IPC) data which highlight that early warning and the mobilization of a large-scale, multi-sectoral humanitarian response have eased famine in some part of the country. Addressing journalists Monday in Juba during a press conference, Plan International Director of International Programmes, Mr. Jonathan Mitchell, urged the international community and humanitarian actors not to sit back as the number of people who are food insecure have risen from 5.5 million to 6 million, 45,000 people are still experiencing localized famine conditions, and 1.7 million others are one-step below famine. While welcoming the UN-backed food security report, he said: “There is every reason to celebrate humanitarian efforts that have led to a reduction in the number of people living in famine conditions in South Sudan, the country is […]

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South Sudan famine ebbs, but situation still desperate as hunger spreads

People in conflict-affected areas collect food from WFP. Photo credit - AfricaNews

More than 6 million people now facing hunger driven largely by conflict By Daniel Deng Bol According to the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) update by the government, the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization, UN children’s fund, the World Food Programme, and other humanitarian partners, the accepted technical definition of famine no longer applies in former Unity State’s Leer and Mayandit counties where famine was declared in February. In two other counties deemed high risk in February – Koch and Panyijiar – immediate and sustained humanitarian assistance most likely played a significant role in preventing further deterioration into famine. Famine has eased in South Sudan after a significant scale up in the humanitarian response, according to new analysis released today. However, the situation remains dire across the country as the number of people struggling to find enough food each day has grown to 6 million – up from 4.9 […]

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JMEC, UNESCO organize media training to enhance journalists’ understanding on peace agreement

Journalists attending the IGAD training workshop (Photo credit: Gurtong). Many workshops are organized in effort to improve media.

By Daniel Deng Bol The Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Commission(JMEC) in collaboration with the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) have organized a two-day workshop starting Monday in the South Sudanese capital Juba on Monday to enhance the understanding of the media on the provisions of the Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in the Republic of South Sudan. On his opening remarks, JMEC Chief of Staff Amb. Berhanu Kebede said: ” the media today is playing an outstanding role in creating and shaping public opinion and strengthening the political, economic and social basis of any given society. As a fourth pillar of democracy along with the judiciary, executive and legislature, the media today have an all-embracing role to act against injustice and continuously inform citizens of the changes taking place in the respective society”. Amb. Kebede said the workshop is both timely and of great importance […]

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An Anti-Nepotism Legislation Could Combat Corruption

President Kiir at the inauguration of the Transitional National Legislative Assembly in 2016.

  An appeal to law-makers to introduce anti-nepotism legislation By Daniel Deng Bol As the country faces the prospect of sliding from recession into slump, coupled with audacious corruption, law-makers in the Transitional National Legislative Assembly should introduce a legislation to prevent nepotism in government appointments. If an anti-nepotism law were adapted and passed into law by the August House it would prohibit any public official from hiring family members to an agency or office which he or she should not have led. This has proven to curb corruption in most of the developed countries. The United States and many other countries, for instance, are typical examples. By definition, nepotism is favoritism granted to relatives, and it is considered as one of the fundamental factors which breeds corruption. Leaders should hire and fire people based on public interest, but instead our leaders now hire and fire at will. Try to picture […]

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The Key Catalysts that Contribute to the Deterioration of Security: Case Study of Jonglei State, South Sudan

A pie chart showing the parties involved in the Jonglei Conflict

(Dissertation Report Submitted to the Faculty of Defence and Security as Requirement for the Partial fulfilment of Master’s Degree in Management Science of Cranfield University By Kuol Gabriel Nyok Kur Executive Summary The phenomena of cattle raiding, inter-tribal conflict and revenge killings amongst the pastoralists of South Sudan particularly in Jonglei State where the trend has increased international concern over the past few years given its intensity in terms of lives and properties as to how the newest nation can overcome the challenges of nation-building in terms of governance. For example, on  1st January 2012, a group of armed Lou Nuer youth estimated at 6,000 attacked Pibor town targeting members of Murle ethnic background at the same time burning down all the existing infrastructures as well as killing 1,000 civilians. This barbaric behaviour by the state inhabitants has left the state exposed to the ravages of insecurity hence, the deteriorating […]

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Assessment of Factors that Prevent Pregnant Mothers from Attending Antennal Care Services in Munuki Payam (Juba, 2015)

Factors affecting attendance of FANC among Pregnant Women in Munuki Payam (Juba, South Sudan)

Authors: Jok  Peter  Mayom  Jil, Peter Mawiir Piol Deng, and Ayak Mading Ador Deng (Research submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Award of BSc. in Public and Environmental Health at Upper Nile University) Chapter One: Introduction 1.1 Background to the Study Maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality have continued to be a major problem in developing countries of which South Sudan is part despite efforts to reverse the trend. Globally, more than 500,000 mothers die each year from pregnancy-related conditions, and neonatal mortality accounts for almost 40% of the estimated 9.7 million children under-five deaths (UNICEF, 2009). In addition, 99% of maternal and newborn mortality occur in developing countries. The greatest risk of maternal deaths, which is now compounded by the HIV/AIDS pandemic, is faced by women in Sub-Saharan Africa (O’Callaghan, 1999). Research has shown that most of the maternal and neonatal deaths are avoidable (Stevens-Simon, 2002). Antenatal care is […]

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Notes from China: Prosperity in Principle

By Thon Thon Following my recent visit to China, in which I attended a seminar on Parasitic Diseases Control and Elimination with the view to sharing experiences in service delivery structure and social administration of the Chinese system, I find it relevant to reflect on a few things. I believe every South Sudan who visits China is amazed by the legend of Chinese country whose territory is covering approximately 9.6 million square kilometers. It is the world’s second large area with a population of over 1.381 billion. The state is governed by the Communist Party of China, the vanguard party based in Beijing, its capital. The adage ‘no pain no gain’ – if you don’t work you won’t have food – rules China. Nobody wears eyeglasses or suits, no idleness at all. Behind the Chinese people is their unwavering government, with laws that satisfy their worth. Once you get there, you think […]

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